A Mixed Methods Study to Explore the Impact of VideoTechnology to BOOST Preceptor Recruitment
AAPA ePoster library. D'Aquila M. 05/17/17; 180569; 259
MItzi D'Aquila
MItzi D'Aquila
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Abstract
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Idea: A video recruitment tool targeting potential preceptors for PA students, and assess its impact on clinician attitudes toward teaching students in the future. Rationale: The recent rapid expansion of existing medical programs, opening of new allopathic and osteopathic medical schools, and larger class sizes, along with explosion in the number of training programs for nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs), will meet the need for future primary care providers and address gaps in healthcare access. However, this trend has created an escalating shortage of clinical training sites to accommodate many of those learners. There is an acute need to recruit more clinicians as preceptors. Studies suggest that significant barriers to precepting medical students include the lack of organizational support, negative perceptions about quality of students and need for faculty development. Conversely, motivators to teach include 'giving back to the profession', CME credit, and university incentives. There is limited evidence for effective interventions to increase the preceptor pool for medical education. There are multiple challenges to recruitment of practicing clinicians to precept physician assistant students. New recruitment tools are needed to enhance these efforts. We examined the impact of a video recruitment tool on clinician attitude about precepting physician assistant students. The video platform created would serve as a model that could be replicated by other schools, and be generalized for other health profession students. Our primary aim was to examine the attitude of potential preceptors toward the video content and their openness to its electronic delivery. Our secondary aim was to explore continuing barriers and facilitators among potential preceptors so as to improve future recruitment strategies. Methods:This is a mixed-method study using a survey and focus groups. A 12-minute web-based video was developed and shown at 3 presentations to potential community preceptors. We sent out invitations to approximately 80-100 providers. Thirty two eligible providers responded and 23 attended the three presentations. Our final participants consisted of 23 primary care providers (22 physicians and 1 nurse practitioner). The video was part of a brief, user-accessible and web-based educational program called BOOST (Bring Out Our Stellar Teachers) targeting potential clinician preceptors. We collected clinician self-reported knowledge of...
Idea: A video recruitment tool targeting potential preceptors for PA students, and assess its impact on clinician attitudes toward teaching students in the future. Rationale: The recent rapid expansion of existing medical programs, opening of new allopathic and osteopathic medical schools, and larger class sizes, along with explosion in the number of training programs for nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician assistants (PAs), will meet the need for future primary care providers and address gaps in healthcare access. However, this trend has created an escalating shortage of clinical training sites to accommodate many of those learners. There is an acute need to recruit more clinicians as preceptors. Studies suggest that significant barriers to precepting medical students include the lack of organizational support, negative perceptions about quality of students and need for faculty development. Conversely, motivators to teach include 'giving back to the profession', CME credit, and university incentives. There is limited evidence for effective interventions to increase the preceptor pool for medical education. There are multiple challenges to recruitment of practicing clinicians to precept physician assistant students. New recruitment tools are needed to enhance these efforts. We examined the impact of a video recruitment tool on clinician attitude about precepting physician assistant students. The video platform created would serve as a model that could be replicated by other schools, and be generalized for other health profession students. Our primary aim was to examine the attitude of potential preceptors toward the video content and their openness to its electronic delivery. Our secondary aim was to explore continuing barriers and facilitators among potential preceptors so as to improve future recruitment strategies. Methods:This is a mixed-method study using a survey and focus groups. A 12-minute web-based video was developed and shown at 3 presentations to potential community preceptors. We sent out invitations to approximately 80-100 providers. Thirty two eligible providers responded and 23 attended the three presentations. Our final participants consisted of 23 primary care providers (22 physicians and 1 nurse practitioner). The video was part of a brief, user-accessible and web-based educational program called BOOST (Bring Out Our Stellar Teachers) targeting potential clinician preceptors. We collected clinician self-reported knowledge of...
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