Anticipated Student Debt Among Newly Matriculated Physician Assistant Students in 2014: Do Who and Where Matter?
AAPA ePoster library. Gonzalez-Colaso R. 05/17/17; 180568; 257
Rosana Gonzalez-Colaso
Rosana Gonzalez-Colaso
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Abstract
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Purpose: Graduate level student indebtedness is a growing concern for various healthcare professions. Eighty five percent of first year Physician Assistant (PA) students reported depending on loans to finance their education, with 39% of these expecting their total debt to exceed $100,000 and close to half of them entering with prior educational debt averaging over $35,000. This study provides the first analysis to date that associates PA students' and PA educational programs' characteristics with anticipated student debt. Methodology: This cross-sectional study utilizes a subset of the 2014 Physician Assistant Education Association (PAEA) Matriculant Survey data merged with publicly available data available at PA programs' websites on January 2016. Our dataset included 5081 unique PA student responses representing 151 PA Programs. Our main outcome was 'high anticipated student debt' defined as debt over $100,000. We conducted a multivariate logistic cluster analysis to model our outcome of interest by student descriptors and by program elements. Statistical significance was determined using chi squared statistic. Results are reported as adjusted odds ratios (ORAdj) at p ≤ 0.05. Results: We found significant association between high-anticipated student debt and key PA student and PA program characteristics. High-anticipated student debt was significantly associated with PA students' loan levels accrued before entering PA school and reported current consumer debt. The strongest statistically significant factor associated with high-anticipated PA student debt was having previous educational loan over $75,000 (ORAdj 6.71; 95% CI 4.74-9.48) when compared to students with no previous educational loans. High-anticipated student debt was also strongly associated with students reporting any level of reported consumer debt, including below the mean level of $12,100 (ORAdj 1.57; 95% CI 1.28-1.94) and above the mean level of $12,100 (ORAdj 1.56; 95% CI 1.28-1.94) when compared to students reporting no consumer debt. We found that certain student demographics showed noteworthy findings. When compared to non Hispanic white students, having high anticipated debt was less likely for students identifying as Hispanic (ORAdj 0.56; 95% CI 0.41-.75) or students identifying as black (ORAdj .76; 95% CI .59-.99). Being married also resulted in a protective effect from high-anticipated student debt (ORAdj 0.05; 95% CI 0.39-0.63). Several program level ch...
Purpose: Graduate level student indebtedness is a growing concern for various healthcare professions. Eighty five percent of first year Physician Assistant (PA) students reported depending on loans to finance their education, with 39% of these expecting their total debt to exceed $100,000 and close to half of them entering with prior educational debt averaging over $35,000. This study provides the first analysis to date that associates PA students' and PA educational programs' characteristics with anticipated student debt. Methodology: This cross-sectional study utilizes a subset of the 2014 Physician Assistant Education Association (PAEA) Matriculant Survey data merged with publicly available data available at PA programs' websites on January 2016. Our dataset included 5081 unique PA student responses representing 151 PA Programs. Our main outcome was 'high anticipated student debt' defined as debt over $100,000. We conducted a multivariate logistic cluster analysis to model our outcome of interest by student descriptors and by program elements. Statistical significance was determined using chi squared statistic. Results are reported as adjusted odds ratios (ORAdj) at p ≤ 0.05. Results: We found significant association between high-anticipated student debt and key PA student and PA program characteristics. High-anticipated student debt was significantly associated with PA students' loan levels accrued before entering PA school and reported current consumer debt. The strongest statistically significant factor associated with high-anticipated PA student debt was having previous educational loan over $75,000 (ORAdj 6.71; 95% CI 4.74-9.48) when compared to students with no previous educational loans. High-anticipated student debt was also strongly associated with students reporting any level of reported consumer debt, including below the mean level of $12,100 (ORAdj 1.57; 95% CI 1.28-1.94) and above the mean level of $12,100 (ORAdj 1.56; 95% CI 1.28-1.94) when compared to students reporting no consumer debt. We found that certain student demographics showed noteworthy findings. When compared to non Hispanic white students, having high anticipated debt was less likely for students identifying as Hispanic (ORAdj 0.56; 95% CI 0.41-.75) or students identifying as black (ORAdj .76; 95% CI .59-.99). Being married also resulted in a protective effect from high-anticipated student debt (ORAdj 0.05; 95% CI 0.39-0.63). Several program level ch...
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