An Analysis of Diseases and Disorders Encountered in PA Practice Based on Data Obtained Through a Practice Analysis Study
AAPA ePoster library. Wick K. 05/17/17; 180565; 252
Keren Wick
Keren Wick
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Abstract
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Background In 2010 the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) offered a five-year grant program that would fund student stipends to support aspiring physician assistants (PAs) planning to enter primary healthcare practice upon graduation from PA school. The intention was to provide $22,000 per year for two years for each awardee, with the fifth and final year of funding offering just one year of support to the last cohort. This PA program received one of the larger grant awards, with potential to fund approximately 50 extra PA school seats for future primary care clinicians. Methods This PA program adapted its existing admissions procedure to evaluate potential primary care stipend scholars during the interview process. Between 9 and 14 students were identified during each of the five years of the project to receive the scholarship funds. These students represented additional seats in the PA program. Stipend funds were disbursed each academic quarter directly into the students' tuition accounts, ensuring appropriate utilization of the federal monies. The program convened quarterly primary care lunch-time seminars during the didactic, classroom phase of the PA program. During the spring quarter, clinical-phase students were also able to join the seminar during a well-timed campus call-back week. All students are required to complete a four-month family medicine rotation, with most students also rotating through a medically underserved setting (urban or rural) for one month. Students often identify their first post-graduate PA job during one of these rotations. Results Over the course of the grant project period, the PA program was able to provide some level of support to a total of 52 students who have graduated or are anticipated to graduate on time. The reassignment of funds from one student to the next was approved by HRSA after detailed communication with the Project Officer. Of the 52 stipend students, 28 (54%) were female. The age at graduation ranged (or will) from 26 to 51, with the average graduation age at 31. Of this group, 10 (19%) were underrepresented minorities (URM, using current federal definitions), and an additional 18 (35%) non-URM students had either an educational or economically disadvantaged background (self-declared based on federal definitions). Based on either residence at time of application to PA school or where the students attended high school, the total number of stipend scholars wi...
Background In 2010 the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) offered a five-year grant program that would fund student stipends to support aspiring physician assistants (PAs) planning to enter primary healthcare practice upon graduation from PA school. The intention was to provide $22,000 per year for two years for each awardee, with the fifth and final year of funding offering just one year of support to the last cohort. This PA program received one of the larger grant awards, with potential to fund approximately 50 extra PA school seats for future primary care clinicians. Methods This PA program adapted its existing admissions procedure to evaluate potential primary care stipend scholars during the interview process. Between 9 and 14 students were identified during each of the five years of the project to receive the scholarship funds. These students represented additional seats in the PA program. Stipend funds were disbursed each academic quarter directly into the students' tuition accounts, ensuring appropriate utilization of the federal monies. The program convened quarterly primary care lunch-time seminars during the didactic, classroom phase of the PA program. During the spring quarter, clinical-phase students were also able to join the seminar during a well-timed campus call-back week. All students are required to complete a four-month family medicine rotation, with most students also rotating through a medically underserved setting (urban or rural) for one month. Students often identify their first post-graduate PA job during one of these rotations. Results Over the course of the grant project period, the PA program was able to provide some level of support to a total of 52 students who have graduated or are anticipated to graduate on time. The reassignment of funds from one student to the next was approved by HRSA after detailed communication with the Project Officer. Of the 52 stipend students, 28 (54%) were female. The age at graduation ranged (or will) from 26 to 51, with the average graduation age at 31. Of this group, 10 (19%) were underrepresented minorities (URM, using current federal definitions), and an additional 18 (35%) non-URM students had either an educational or economically disadvantaged background (self-declared based on federal definitions). Based on either residence at time of application to PA school or where the students attended high school, the total number of stipend scholars wi...
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