Reviving the PA doctorate debate: A look at PA faculty trends
AAPA ePoster library. Kibe L. 05/17/17; 180557; 235
Lucy Kibe
Lucy Kibe
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Abstract
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Purpose: The debate on doctoral education for PAs has continued for the past two decades. Enthusiasts on both sides of the table agree that lack of doctorally prepared PA faculty will be a big challenge to this move. As the debate continues, both AAPA and PAEA support advanced professional education for PAs, including postprofessional doctorate education1. Orcutt, et al2 studied the doctoral pipeline in PA education from 1999 to 2002 and predicted that the number of doctorally prepared PA faculty would double by 2010. There have been no recent studies to analyze the current trends on this topic. The purpose of this study was to characterize the trends of doctorally prepared PA faculty and the types of doctorate degrees pursued. Methodology: We evaluated cross-sectional aggregate data from the past 19 PA faculty survey reports (1996-2015) publicly available at paeaonline.org3,4 and also obtained data from PAEA research department5. We defined faculty as teaching faculty, program directors and medical directors independent of PA credentials. Because the method of reporting from 1996-2007; 2008–2013; and 2014-2015 were different, we analyzed these data separately. For reports from 1996-2007, we calculated the median of the percentage of faculty (excluding medical directors) and program directors (excluding medical directors) who reported having a doctorate degree. We further identified gender differences among doctorally prepared program directors for this period. For the 2008-2013 reports, the only relevant data available was the percentage of faculty (including medical directors) who reported having a doctorate degree. For the 2014-2015 reports, we identified the percentage of faculty (excluding medical directors) who reported having a doctorate degree, the type of doctorate degrees earned, and the proportion of doctorally prepared faculty with PA credentials. Of note, prior to 2014, the specific type of doctorate degree earned was not reported in the public reports. Results: 1996-2007: Excluding medical directors, the number of faculty with a doctorate degree ranged from 34-111. This computed to a median of 15% (range; 12-19%) over this period. When the data was limited to program directors, the median more than doubled at 36% (range; 28-41%). Data on gender differences was only available among program directors. Among program directors with doctorate degrees, the 11-year median was 37% (range; 29-52%) for females and 63% (range; 48-71%) for males...
Purpose: The debate on doctoral education for PAs has continued for the past two decades. Enthusiasts on both sides of the table agree that lack of doctorally prepared PA faculty will be a big challenge to this move. As the debate continues, both AAPA and PAEA support advanced professional education for PAs, including postprofessional doctorate education1. Orcutt, et al2 studied the doctoral pipeline in PA education from 1999 to 2002 and predicted that the number of doctorally prepared PA faculty would double by 2010. There have been no recent studies to analyze the current trends on this topic. The purpose of this study was to characterize the trends of doctorally prepared PA faculty and the types of doctorate degrees pursued. Methodology: We evaluated cross-sectional aggregate data from the past 19 PA faculty survey reports (1996-2015) publicly available at paeaonline.org3,4 and also obtained data from PAEA research department5. We defined faculty as teaching faculty, program directors and medical directors independent of PA credentials. Because the method of reporting from 1996-2007; 2008–2013; and 2014-2015 were different, we analyzed these data separately. For reports from 1996-2007, we calculated the median of the percentage of faculty (excluding medical directors) and program directors (excluding medical directors) who reported having a doctorate degree. We further identified gender differences among doctorally prepared program directors for this period. For the 2008-2013 reports, the only relevant data available was the percentage of faculty (including medical directors) who reported having a doctorate degree. For the 2014-2015 reports, we identified the percentage of faculty (excluding medical directors) who reported having a doctorate degree, the type of doctorate degrees earned, and the proportion of doctorally prepared faculty with PA credentials. Of note, prior to 2014, the specific type of doctorate degree earned was not reported in the public reports. Results: 1996-2007: Excluding medical directors, the number of faculty with a doctorate degree ranged from 34-111. This computed to a median of 15% (range; 12-19%) over this period. When the data was limited to program directors, the median more than doubled at 36% (range; 28-41%). Data on gender differences was only available among program directors. Among program directors with doctorate degrees, the 11-year median was 37% (range; 29-52%) for females and 63% (range; 48-71%) for males...
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