Relationship between Pre-Clinical Courses and End of Didactic Year PACKRAT Examination: A Correlational Study Examining Gender, Age, and Experience
AAPA ePoster library. Gabrick J. 05/17/17; 180556; 234
John Gabrick
John Gabrick
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.
Abstract
Rate & Comment (0)
Purpose: This research examines the relationship between academic success in didactic year classes and the end of first year PACKRAT when comparing variables such as gender-, age- and experience-based differences in both traditional and non-traditional students. Using exam scores from students taking PANCE-related courses over the first year of a PA program, we attempted to 1) determine the difference in mean examination scores between the groups for any future PANCE-related courses based on gender, age, and experience, 2) determine whether there was a statistically significant difference in scores of the PACKRAT when examining similar gender, age, and experience stratifications and 3) determine if gender, age, or experience (or any combination) have a correlation with academic success. With such a close connection between educational performance and PACKRAT scores and PANCE performance, we will determine whether this difference persists through the PANCE certification exam as well. Methodology: A correlational study of the exam scores of students in PANCE-related courses over the course of two semesters, ongoing. Exams were proctored and taken simultaneously via web by all students and then graded using an electronic system in order to remove scoring inconsistencies. After adjusting for exam errors (using point Bi-serial), the raw scores along with the student's gender, age and experience classification (independent variables) were analyzed using 2 X 2 ANOVA with the null hypothesis of no differences in means, versus the alternate hypothesis. T-tests were also calculated based on the initial ANOVA results. In addition, a regression analysis was conducted to determine the correlation (R2) between the independent variables and academic performance including the PACKRAT score. Results or Proposed Analysis: Due to data collection still in process, the analysis is incomplete at the time of submission, but will be completed by the end of April 2017. When analyzing the correlation between Clinical Medicine I/II and Pharmacology I/II, it was noteworthy that the correlation was r=.77. Correlation between gender and performance was r= .57. The correlation between PACK RAT I and Clinical Medicine and Pharmacology is pending. Results of analyzing interactive factors between academic performance in Clinical Medicine I/II, Pharmacology I/II, PACKRAT I and gender, age, and experience level is pending. Analysis of students who received overall perfo...
Purpose: This research examines the relationship between academic success in didactic year classes and the end of first year PACKRAT when comparing variables such as gender-, age- and experience-based differences in both traditional and non-traditional students. Using exam scores from students taking PANCE-related courses over the first year of a PA program, we attempted to 1) determine the difference in mean examination scores between the groups for any future PANCE-related courses based on gender, age, and experience, 2) determine whether there was a statistically significant difference in scores of the PACKRAT when examining similar gender, age, and experience stratifications and 3) determine if gender, age, or experience (or any combination) have a correlation with academic success. With such a close connection between educational performance and PACKRAT scores and PANCE performance, we will determine whether this difference persists through the PANCE certification exam as well. Methodology: A correlational study of the exam scores of students in PANCE-related courses over the course of two semesters, ongoing. Exams were proctored and taken simultaneously via web by all students and then graded using an electronic system in order to remove scoring inconsistencies. After adjusting for exam errors (using point Bi-serial), the raw scores along with the student's gender, age and experience classification (independent variables) were analyzed using 2 X 2 ANOVA with the null hypothesis of no differences in means, versus the alternate hypothesis. T-tests were also calculated based on the initial ANOVA results. In addition, a regression analysis was conducted to determine the correlation (R2) between the independent variables and academic performance including the PACKRAT score. Results or Proposed Analysis: Due to data collection still in process, the analysis is incomplete at the time of submission, but will be completed by the end of April 2017. When analyzing the correlation between Clinical Medicine I/II and Pharmacology I/II, it was noteworthy that the correlation was r=.77. Correlation between gender and performance was r= .57. The correlation between PACK RAT I and Clinical Medicine and Pharmacology is pending. Results of analyzing interactive factors between academic performance in Clinical Medicine I/II, Pharmacology I/II, PACKRAT I and gender, age, and experience level is pending. Analysis of students who received overall perfo...
    This eLearning portal is powered by:
    This eLearning portal is powered by MULTIEPORTAL
Anonymous User Privacy Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies (Always Active)

MULTILEARNING platforms and tools hereinafter referred as “MLG SOFTWARE” are provided to you as pure educational platforms/services requiring cookies to operate. In the case of the MLG SOFTWARE, cookies are essential for the Platform to function properly for the provision of education. If these cookies are disabled, a large subset of the functionality provided by the Platform will either be unavailable or cease to work as expected. The MLG SOFTWARE do not capture non-essential activities such as menu items and listings you click on or pages viewed.


Performance Cookies

Performance cookies are used to analyse how visitors use a website in order to provide a better user experience.


Save Settings