Effects of Health Care Provider Dress on Confidence Level among Undergraduate and Graduate Students
AAPA ePoster library. Zajicek J. 05/17/17; 180542; 206
Jami Zajicek
Jami Zajicek
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Abstract
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Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine if health care provider dress impacts the level of confidence during the patient-provider interaction. Method: The study, using survey methodology, was conducted using undergraduate and graduate students at Seton Hall University as voluntary participants. This survey was originally presented in the study 'Clinical research study: What to wear today? Effect of doctor's attire on the trust and confidence of patients' by Rehman SU, Nietert PJ, Cope DW, Kilpatrick AO, and was utilized in this study with permission from the authors. Respondents completed the written survey after reviewing pictures of heath care providers in four different dress styles. Respondents were asked questions related to their preference for health care provider dress and its effect on patient confidence. 'Confidence' was defined as the participant's trust in the provider, willingness to follow advice, and return for follow-up care, as well as the provider's level of knowledge, compassion, responsibility, and authority, all of which was perceived through dress. Results: One-hundred-twenty-four respondents with 96% aged 18-25 years were enrolled; 37.9% were male, 62.1% were female, 65.3% were undergraduate students, and 34.7% were graduate students. On all questions regarding health care provider dress style preferences in relation to patient confidence, respondents significantly favored the professional attire with white coat. Fifty-eight percent of respondents indicated that they would trust this provider, 56.5% would be more likely to follow their advice, 61% would have the most confidence in the diagnosis, 55.6% would have the most confidence in their treatment, 58.9% would return for follow-up care, 70.2% expected the provider to be more knowledgeable, and 59.7% expected the provider to be more responsible. The sole outlier found was 42.7% of the respondents felt that the health care provider dressed in scrubs was expected to be the most compassionate. Overall, there was no significance between the sexes or level of education on the results. Further analysis will be performed in the coming weeks to determine overall significance in order to definitively accept or reject our hypothesis. Conclusion: It is believed that respondents favor health care providers in professional attire with a white coat. Though the specific statistical calculations have yet to be performed to prove this statement, the frequency data suggests ...
Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine if health care provider dress impacts the level of confidence during the patient-provider interaction. Method: The study, using survey methodology, was conducted using undergraduate and graduate students at Seton Hall University as voluntary participants. This survey was originally presented in the study 'Clinical research study: What to wear today? Effect of doctor's attire on the trust and confidence of patients' by Rehman SU, Nietert PJ, Cope DW, Kilpatrick AO, and was utilized in this study with permission from the authors. Respondents completed the written survey after reviewing pictures of heath care providers in four different dress styles. Respondents were asked questions related to their preference for health care provider dress and its effect on patient confidence. 'Confidence' was defined as the participant's trust in the provider, willingness to follow advice, and return for follow-up care, as well as the provider's level of knowledge, compassion, responsibility, and authority, all of which was perceived through dress. Results: One-hundred-twenty-four respondents with 96% aged 18-25 years were enrolled; 37.9% were male, 62.1% were female, 65.3% were undergraduate students, and 34.7% were graduate students. On all questions regarding health care provider dress style preferences in relation to patient confidence, respondents significantly favored the professional attire with white coat. Fifty-eight percent of respondents indicated that they would trust this provider, 56.5% would be more likely to follow their advice, 61% would have the most confidence in the diagnosis, 55.6% would have the most confidence in their treatment, 58.9% would return for follow-up care, 70.2% expected the provider to be more knowledgeable, and 59.7% expected the provider to be more responsible. The sole outlier found was 42.7% of the respondents felt that the health care provider dressed in scrubs was expected to be the most compassionate. Overall, there was no significance between the sexes or level of education on the results. Further analysis will be performed in the coming weeks to determine overall significance in order to definitively accept or reject our hypothesis. Conclusion: It is believed that respondents favor health care providers in professional attire with a white coat. Though the specific statistical calculations have yet to be performed to prove this statement, the frequency data suggests ...
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