Opioid Screening and Prevention Education among Physician Assistant Students and Practitioners: A National Survey
AAPA ePoster library. Pohler B. 05/17/17; 180541; 204
Brittney Pohler
Brittney Pohler
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Abstract
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Purpose: Opioids are a commonly prescribed medication in health care and our nation is facing an increasing epidemic of opioid abuse. The goal of this study was to survey Physician Assistant (PA) students and practicing PAs on their perceived number of PA program training hours on opioid prescribing practices, screening and prevention and on how well they feel adequately trained regarding pain evaluation/management. Additional goals included investigating how comfortable PA students and PAs are with utilizing at least one clinical practice guideline for prescribing opioids, and utilizing at least one screening tool for opioid abuse. The vision of this study was to evaluate the educational trend concerning opioid education, as well as highlighting potential areas that PA curricula could improve upon regarding opioid education. Methods: An anonymous IRB approved survey including 5-point Likert scale questions was distributed to PA students and practicing PAs. Responses were collected in either hard copy or through online SurveyMonkey®. Survey asked about perceived total hours of training received on opioid prescribing practices (1 = none, 2 = 1-3 hours, 3 = 4-6 hours, 4 = 7-10 hours, and 5 = 11 or more hours), adequacy of PA program training on screening patients for opioid abuse, adequacy of PA program training regarding pain evaluation/management, and comfort utilizing clinical practice guidelines and use of at least one clinical screening tool for opioid abuse. Data was analyzed using SAS 9.4 using a PROC generalized linear based (GLM) model, with sample t test analyses for unequal variances utilized to determine significance between the groups. Statistical significance was considered at p < 0.05. Results: A total of 318 PA providers and 100 PA students completed the survey (N = 418). The average response for students regarding the number of hours received for training on opioid prescribing practices was 2.56 (Standard Error of Mean (SEM) = 0.11) and 2.03 (SEM = 0.05) for practicing PAs. When asked how well respondents felt their PA program trained them to screen patients for opioid abuse, student's average response was 2.87 and practicing PAs average response was 2.56 (p = 0.007). Regarding perceived adequacy of training for pain evaluation and management, student's average response was 3.14 compared to practicing PAs 2.86 (p = 0.004); similarly, confidence towards use of clinical practice guidelines and screening tools differed between the two gro...
Purpose: Opioids are a commonly prescribed medication in health care and our nation is facing an increasing epidemic of opioid abuse. The goal of this study was to survey Physician Assistant (PA) students and practicing PAs on their perceived number of PA program training hours on opioid prescribing practices, screening and prevention and on how well they feel adequately trained regarding pain evaluation/management. Additional goals included investigating how comfortable PA students and PAs are with utilizing at least one clinical practice guideline for prescribing opioids, and utilizing at least one screening tool for opioid abuse. The vision of this study was to evaluate the educational trend concerning opioid education, as well as highlighting potential areas that PA curricula could improve upon regarding opioid education. Methods: An anonymous IRB approved survey including 5-point Likert scale questions was distributed to PA students and practicing PAs. Responses were collected in either hard copy or through online SurveyMonkey®. Survey asked about perceived total hours of training received on opioid prescribing practices (1 = none, 2 = 1-3 hours, 3 = 4-6 hours, 4 = 7-10 hours, and 5 = 11 or more hours), adequacy of PA program training on screening patients for opioid abuse, adequacy of PA program training regarding pain evaluation/management, and comfort utilizing clinical practice guidelines and use of at least one clinical screening tool for opioid abuse. Data was analyzed using SAS 9.4 using a PROC generalized linear based (GLM) model, with sample t test analyses for unequal variances utilized to determine significance between the groups. Statistical significance was considered at p < 0.05. Results: A total of 318 PA providers and 100 PA students completed the survey (N = 418). The average response for students regarding the number of hours received for training on opioid prescribing practices was 2.56 (Standard Error of Mean (SEM) = 0.11) and 2.03 (SEM = 0.05) for practicing PAs. When asked how well respondents felt their PA program trained them to screen patients for opioid abuse, student's average response was 2.87 and practicing PAs average response was 2.56 (p = 0.007). Regarding perceived adequacy of training for pain evaluation and management, student's average response was 3.14 compared to practicing PAs 2.86 (p = 0.004); similarly, confidence towards use of clinical practice guidelines and screening tools differed between the two gro...
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