PA Utilization of Flexibility in Specialty, Role, Employer, and Setting Choice
AAPA ePoster library. Smith N. 05/17/17; 180528; 180
Noel Smith
Noel Smith
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Abstract
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Purpose of Study PAs are educated as medical generalists and recertify as medical generalists. The purpose of this study is to examine career flexibility among PAs, including changes in specialty, setting, employer, and role. Methods Data were collected through the 2016 AAPA Salary Survey. With 15,999 responses, the response rate was 16.4%. The practice demographics of the sample were comparable to those published by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants (which has data that closely approximates the PA universe), indicating the representativeness of our sample in light of a low response rate. The authors examined characteristics of PAs who experienced career changes in 2015 in the form of specialty, setting, employer, and role changes by employing analysis of variance, descriptive, and column proportion statistics. Key Findings In the 2015 AAPA Salary Survey, 8.3% of PAs surveyed indicated that they had changed their specialty within 2014. To gain further understanding of those that changed their specialty, AAPA asked a more robust series of questions in the following year's survey. There was a slight decline in 2015 to 5.5% who indicated that they had changed their specialty. Research suggests that PAs changed their specialty during 2015 about as frequently as they changed their setting (5.6%) and role (5.3%), but they changed their employer twice as often (11.0%). Why did PAs report switching their specialty in 2015? The most common reason was to work in a higher paying specialty (23.3%), followed by being ready for a change (15.0%), and to get better work-life balance (14.3%). Moving (11.4%) and an indication that they always intended on changing specialty after establishing a broad knowledge based in primary care (10.7%) filled out the top five reasons selected for changing specialties. When looking at the reasons for change along with other change data, there may be an indication that PAs did not necessarily intend to change their specialty; rather they sought to change other aspects of their professional career such as hours, location, and compensation. Women were more likely to change specialty, role, and employer in 2015, with 5.9% of women changing versus 4.4% of men. PAs who changed specialty, role and/or employer in 2015 reported a lower base salary from their current employer, were less likely to receive a bonus, and their bonuses were smaller than those of PAs who did not change. When controlling for ...
Purpose of Study PAs are educated as medical generalists and recertify as medical generalists. The purpose of this study is to examine career flexibility among PAs, including changes in specialty, setting, employer, and role. Methods Data were collected through the 2016 AAPA Salary Survey. With 15,999 responses, the response rate was 16.4%. The practice demographics of the sample were comparable to those published by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants (which has data that closely approximates the PA universe), indicating the representativeness of our sample in light of a low response rate. The authors examined characteristics of PAs who experienced career changes in 2015 in the form of specialty, setting, employer, and role changes by employing analysis of variance, descriptive, and column proportion statistics. Key Findings In the 2015 AAPA Salary Survey, 8.3% of PAs surveyed indicated that they had changed their specialty within 2014. To gain further understanding of those that changed their specialty, AAPA asked a more robust series of questions in the following year's survey. There was a slight decline in 2015 to 5.5% who indicated that they had changed their specialty. Research suggests that PAs changed their specialty during 2015 about as frequently as they changed their setting (5.6%) and role (5.3%), but they changed their employer twice as often (11.0%). Why did PAs report switching their specialty in 2015? The most common reason was to work in a higher paying specialty (23.3%), followed by being ready for a change (15.0%), and to get better work-life balance (14.3%). Moving (11.4%) and an indication that they always intended on changing specialty after establishing a broad knowledge based in primary care (10.7%) filled out the top five reasons selected for changing specialties. When looking at the reasons for change along with other change data, there may be an indication that PAs did not necessarily intend to change their specialty; rather they sought to change other aspects of their professional career such as hours, location, and compensation. Women were more likely to change specialty, role, and employer in 2015, with 5.9% of women changing versus 4.4% of men. PAs who changed specialty, role and/or employer in 2015 reported a lower base salary from their current employer, were less likely to receive a bonus, and their bonuses were smaller than those of PAs who did not change. When controlling for ...
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