Perception of BRCA1/2 Gene Mutation Testing and Prophylactic Treatment among Female College Students
AAPA ePoster library. Caporaso L. 05/17/17; 180524; 165
Laura Caporaso
Laura Caporaso
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Abstract
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Purpose: According to the National Cancer Institute, breast cancer is the second most common cancer among American women following skin cancer. Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cancer among women, however it causes more deaths than any other type of female reproductive organ cancer. In 1995, the National Cancer Institute funded a research study which identified two inherited gene mutations linked to both breast and ovarian cancer, BRCA1 and BRCA2. A screening test for these mutations was later developed. With new medical technology and screening procedures, it is now possible to identify individuals at high risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. Due to this, several prophylactic treatment options have become available in recent years. These prophylactic treatment options include risk-reducing surgery, chemo-prevention, and increased surveillance. Current research studies focus mainly on the older female adult population perspective of BRCA testing and prophylactic treatment. However, we seek to understand the perception of BRCA1/2 gene mutation testing and prophylactic treatment options among female college students. Therefore, the purpose of our research study is to determine if college-aged females believe their peers would undergo BRCA genetic testing and if tested positive, would undergo prophylactic treatment and which type of prophylactic method they would choose. Methodology: The research was conducted via a survey-based study. The survey used in this research study was created by the authors and validated by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) at Seton Hall University. The survey consists of 15 questions regarding BRCA genetic testing and breast cancer prophylactic treatment options. Our sample population consisted of 136 female Seton Hall University undergraduate and graduate students between the ages of 18-30 years old. The researchers held a tabling event at the Seton Hall University Center to educate on BRCA genetic testing and have students fill out the paper-based anonymous surveys. The data was then collected and analyzed by the authors. Analysis of the data was performed using SPSS and statistics were calculated using the Chi-Squared test with an alpha of < 0.05. Results: The majority of subjects (94.1% [128]) believed that college-aged female students would choose to undergo BRCA1/2 genetic testing if they had a positive family history of breast or ovarian cancer while 5.8% (8) of participants believed they would not...
Purpose: According to the National Cancer Institute, breast cancer is the second most common cancer among American women following skin cancer. Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cancer among women, however it causes more deaths than any other type of female reproductive organ cancer. In 1995, the National Cancer Institute funded a research study which identified two inherited gene mutations linked to both breast and ovarian cancer, BRCA1 and BRCA2. A screening test for these mutations was later developed. With new medical technology and screening procedures, it is now possible to identify individuals at high risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer. Due to this, several prophylactic treatment options have become available in recent years. These prophylactic treatment options include risk-reducing surgery, chemo-prevention, and increased surveillance. Current research studies focus mainly on the older female adult population perspective of BRCA testing and prophylactic treatment. However, we seek to understand the perception of BRCA1/2 gene mutation testing and prophylactic treatment options among female college students. Therefore, the purpose of our research study is to determine if college-aged females believe their peers would undergo BRCA genetic testing and if tested positive, would undergo prophylactic treatment and which type of prophylactic method they would choose. Methodology: The research was conducted via a survey-based study. The survey used in this research study was created by the authors and validated by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) at Seton Hall University. The survey consists of 15 questions regarding BRCA genetic testing and breast cancer prophylactic treatment options. Our sample population consisted of 136 female Seton Hall University undergraduate and graduate students between the ages of 18-30 years old. The researchers held a tabling event at the Seton Hall University Center to educate on BRCA genetic testing and have students fill out the paper-based anonymous surveys. The data was then collected and analyzed by the authors. Analysis of the data was performed using SPSS and statistics were calculated using the Chi-Squared test with an alpha of < 0.05. Results: The majority of subjects (94.1% [128]) believed that college-aged female students would choose to undergo BRCA1/2 genetic testing if they had a positive family history of breast or ovarian cancer while 5.8% (8) of participants believed they would not...
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