Motivating the African American Patient: What Factors are Involved in Motivating Type 2 Diabetic Patients Adhere to Their Recommended Treatment Plan?
AAPA ePoster library. Freeman-Hildreth Y. 05/17/17; 180523; 162
Yolonda Freeman-Hildreth
Yolonda Freeman-Hildreth
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Abstract
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Diabetes is a chronic disease affecting over 29 million people in the United States (Control & Prevention, 2014; Control, Prevention, Control, & Prevention, 2011; McMaughan et al., 2016). Ninety percent of diabetes cases are characterized as Type 2 diabetes (McMaughan et al., 2016; Walker, Smalls, Bonilha, Campbell, & Egede, 2015), while the remaining 10% have either type 1 diabetes or gestational diabetes (McMaughan et al., 2016). However, African Americans are twice as likely to develop diabetes compared to non-Hispanics affecting one in five individuals over the age on 20 (Steinhardt et al., 2015) increasing future risk of complications of diabetes including retinopathy, chronic kidney disease leading to end-stage renal disease, and lower-extremity peripheral vascular disease with increased risk of amputation (Selvin, 2016). This is a significant concern because as this number continues to climb, this country's economic burden increases due to a greater loss of productivity, disability and premature death (Control et al., 2011; Zimmet, Magliano, Herman, & Shaw, 2014). As of 2012, the United States had a total estimated cost of diabetes estimated to be $176 billion (Li et al., 2015; Zimmet et al., 2014) with a projected increase to $192 billion by 2020 (Hogan, Dall, & Nikolov, 2003) and $622 billion worldwide by 2030 (Rowley, Bezold, Arikan, Byrne, & Krohe, 2016). The key to successful type 2 diabetes treatment consist of glycemic control and self-management (Inzucchi et al., 2015). According to American Diabetes Association (2016) & Schulman‐Green et al. (2012), adequate glucose control requires behavior modification with attention to healthy lifestyle, self-management, and the prevention of complications. Important self-management behaviors include as healthy eating, frequent blood sugar monitoring, medication adherence, problem-solving skills, coping skills and risk-reduction behaviors (Shrivastava, Shrivastava, & Ramasamy, 2013). However, these actions have a considerable impact on the individual, affecting their quality of life, career, and day-to-day decisions making due to the behavior changes diabetics are required to conformed to (Schulman‐Green et al., 2012). These individuals are requested to suddenly stop their current way of living in order to begin behavior modifications without their own initiation. According to Polonsky et al. (1995) & (Larsen, 2009), many patients become overwhelmed by the intensive regimen of self-care...
Diabetes is a chronic disease affecting over 29 million people in the United States (Control & Prevention, 2014; Control, Prevention, Control, & Prevention, 2011; McMaughan et al., 2016). Ninety percent of diabetes cases are characterized as Type 2 diabetes (McMaughan et al., 2016; Walker, Smalls, Bonilha, Campbell, & Egede, 2015), while the remaining 10% have either type 1 diabetes or gestational diabetes (McMaughan et al., 2016). However, African Americans are twice as likely to develop diabetes compared to non-Hispanics affecting one in five individuals over the age on 20 (Steinhardt et al., 2015) increasing future risk of complications of diabetes including retinopathy, chronic kidney disease leading to end-stage renal disease, and lower-extremity peripheral vascular disease with increased risk of amputation (Selvin, 2016). This is a significant concern because as this number continues to climb, this country's economic burden increases due to a greater loss of productivity, disability and premature death (Control et al., 2011; Zimmet, Magliano, Herman, & Shaw, 2014). As of 2012, the United States had a total estimated cost of diabetes estimated to be $176 billion (Li et al., 2015; Zimmet et al., 2014) with a projected increase to $192 billion by 2020 (Hogan, Dall, & Nikolov, 2003) and $622 billion worldwide by 2030 (Rowley, Bezold, Arikan, Byrne, & Krohe, 2016). The key to successful type 2 diabetes treatment consist of glycemic control and self-management (Inzucchi et al., 2015). According to American Diabetes Association (2016) & Schulman‐Green et al. (2012), adequate glucose control requires behavior modification with attention to healthy lifestyle, self-management, and the prevention of complications. Important self-management behaviors include as healthy eating, frequent blood sugar monitoring, medication adherence, problem-solving skills, coping skills and risk-reduction behaviors (Shrivastava, Shrivastava, & Ramasamy, 2013). However, these actions have a considerable impact on the individual, affecting their quality of life, career, and day-to-day decisions making due to the behavior changes diabetics are required to conformed to (Schulman‐Green et al., 2012). These individuals are requested to suddenly stop their current way of living in order to begin behavior modifications without their own initiation. According to Polonsky et al. (1995) & (Larsen, 2009), many patients become overwhelmed by the intensive regimen of self-care...
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