An ARMY PA's Experience in Yoga Therapy: What Other Healthcare Providers Need to Know and How it Can Benefit their Patients
AAPA ePoster library. McCarthy A. 05/17/17; 180517; 146
Adhana McCarthy
Adhana McCarthy
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.
Abstract
Rate & Comment (0)
Objective: To provide healthcare providers information on yoga therapy and how it can benefit their patients. Background: Yoga Therapy is the process of empowering individuals to progress toward improved health and well-being through the application of the philosophy and practice of yoga. It is a comprehensive, patient centered, integrative approach that views lifestyle diseases as multifactorial and addresses underlying causes long term to reach behavior change (Khalsa, Cohen, McCall, & Telles, 2016, pp. 6-11). A certified yoga therapist (C-IAYT) is trained to apply different modalities to include breathing, meditation, postures and lifestyle changes to help their patient (IAYT, 2016). Therapeutic yoga is starting to become a part of the Integrated Pain Management Centers (IPMCs) across the Army. Purpose: To provide information on the difference between yoga and yoga therapy, information on yoga therapy options, provide referral guidance for yoga therapy and yoga therapy training for healthcare providers. Method: A qualitative clinical vignette method based on CPT(P) McCarthy's experience in yoga therapy. CPT(P) McCarthy, a yoga instructor with a 200 hour training certificate, completed an additional 300-hour yoga therapy training program accredited by the International Association of Yoga Therapists (IAYT). She came to understand that the training was designed to take a dedicated yoga teacher from being able to teach group classes to practically applying yogic concepts of postures, breathing, meditation, and Ayurvedic medicine to address patient concerns. Additionally, although yoga therapists do not make medical diagnoses, she learned that their training includes western anatomy and pathology, basic SOAP note documentation and referral guidelines to other medical providers. In total, the yoga therapists training starts with the basic 200 hour yoga teacher certificate and builds on that foundation with 800 hours of additional training to include 200 hours of practicum and mentorship. The yoga therapist typically has 1000 hours of training when complete, compared to the entry level yoga instructor with 200 hours of training. Results: Thus far, CPT(P) McCarthy has been using yoga therapy principles in treating her patients with insomnia and chronic pain since starting the training and has seen promising results. This enables her to enhance her skills in primary care. Yoga therapists positions are a part of several Army's IPMCs ...
Objective: To provide healthcare providers information on yoga therapy and how it can benefit their patients. Background: Yoga Therapy is the process of empowering individuals to progress toward improved health and well-being through the application of the philosophy and practice of yoga. It is a comprehensive, patient centered, integrative approach that views lifestyle diseases as multifactorial and addresses underlying causes long term to reach behavior change (Khalsa, Cohen, McCall, & Telles, 2016, pp. 6-11). A certified yoga therapist (C-IAYT) is trained to apply different modalities to include breathing, meditation, postures and lifestyle changes to help their patient (IAYT, 2016). Therapeutic yoga is starting to become a part of the Integrated Pain Management Centers (IPMCs) across the Army. Purpose: To provide information on the difference between yoga and yoga therapy, information on yoga therapy options, provide referral guidance for yoga therapy and yoga therapy training for healthcare providers. Method: A qualitative clinical vignette method based on CPT(P) McCarthy's experience in yoga therapy. CPT(P) McCarthy, a yoga instructor with a 200 hour training certificate, completed an additional 300-hour yoga therapy training program accredited by the International Association of Yoga Therapists (IAYT). She came to understand that the training was designed to take a dedicated yoga teacher from being able to teach group classes to practically applying yogic concepts of postures, breathing, meditation, and Ayurvedic medicine to address patient concerns. Additionally, although yoga therapists do not make medical diagnoses, she learned that their training includes western anatomy and pathology, basic SOAP note documentation and referral guidelines to other medical providers. In total, the yoga therapists training starts with the basic 200 hour yoga teacher certificate and builds on that foundation with 800 hours of additional training to include 200 hours of practicum and mentorship. The yoga therapist typically has 1000 hours of training when complete, compared to the entry level yoga instructor with 200 hours of training. Results: Thus far, CPT(P) McCarthy has been using yoga therapy principles in treating her patients with insomnia and chronic pain since starting the training and has seen promising results. This enables her to enhance her skills in primary care. Yoga therapists positions are a part of several Army's IPMCs ...
    This eLearning portal is powered by:
    This eLearning portal is powered by MULTIEPORTAL
Anonymous User Privacy Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies (Always Active)

MULTILEARNING platforms and tools hereinafter referred as “MLG SOFTWARE” are provided to you as pure educational platforms/services requiring cookies to operate. In the case of the MLG SOFTWARE, cookies are essential for the Platform to function properly for the provision of education. If these cookies are disabled, a large subset of the functionality provided by the Platform will either be unavailable or cease to work as expected. The MLG SOFTWARE do not capture non-essential activities such as menu items and listings you click on or pages viewed.


Performance Cookies

Performance cookies are used to analyse how visitors use a website in order to provide a better user experience.


Save Settings