Simulation Clinical Experience: Addressing the Shortage of Clinical Sites
AAPA ePoster library. Rota M. 05/17/17; 180509; 132
Michael Rota
Michael Rota
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Abstract
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Purpose:Our purpose was to assess the impact of simulation learning experiences and to compare their effectiveness to that of traditional supervised clinical practice experiences (SCPE). One of the current challenges facing PA education is the availability of quality clinical sites for supervised clinical practical experiences (Guinane & Molloy, 2013). As programs across the nation grapple with finding adequate numbers of strong clinical placements, there is a need to consider the role of alternative learning modalities to supplement existing SCPEs. Simulation learning has been recognized as an effective teaching modality with learning outcomes often stronger than those derived from conventional experiences (Multak, Euliano, Gabrielli, & Layon, 2002). Description:To help bridge the gap created by the shortage of clinical placements, our program developed a pilot clinical experience utilizing high-fidelity patient simulators in our simulation laboratory that would complement traditional SCPEs. This endeavor was founded on literature supporting the comparative effectiveness of simulation-based medical education to traditional methods of clinical medical education (McGaghie, Issenberg, Cohen, Barsuk, & Wayne, 2011). All students participated in both the traditional SCPE as well as two days of clinical experiences in the simulation laboratory. Both experiences were followed by the completion of surveys with the same ten questions reflecting on the effectiveness of the clinical experience as well as the effectiveness of the instructor/preceptor. Utilizing IBM SPSS Statistics 24, the data collected was analyzed by question, category, and overall experience. Results:Surveys were collected from the students after participation in both the simulation and SCPEs. There were a total of 44 respondents with a demographic distribution of a majority of females (65.2%), 20 to 24 years of age (91.3%). Both surveys contained 10 questions reflecting upon the learning experience (5 questions) and instructor/preceptor effectiveness (5 questions). All responses were based on a Likert scale ranging from 1 to 5 (1 = strongly disagree, 5 = strongly agree). Overall, there was a significant difference in responses when comparing the evaluation of the simulation learning (mean=4.9/5) to the traditional supervised clinical practice experience (mean=4.6/5) with a p-value of 0.03. In particular, significant differences in responses were noted with respect to go...
Purpose:Our purpose was to assess the impact of simulation learning experiences and to compare their effectiveness to that of traditional supervised clinical practice experiences (SCPE). One of the current challenges facing PA education is the availability of quality clinical sites for supervised clinical practical experiences (Guinane & Molloy, 2013). As programs across the nation grapple with finding adequate numbers of strong clinical placements, there is a need to consider the role of alternative learning modalities to supplement existing SCPEs. Simulation learning has been recognized as an effective teaching modality with learning outcomes often stronger than those derived from conventional experiences (Multak, Euliano, Gabrielli, & Layon, 2002). Description:To help bridge the gap created by the shortage of clinical placements, our program developed a pilot clinical experience utilizing high-fidelity patient simulators in our simulation laboratory that would complement traditional SCPEs. This endeavor was founded on literature supporting the comparative effectiveness of simulation-based medical education to traditional methods of clinical medical education (McGaghie, Issenberg, Cohen, Barsuk, & Wayne, 2011). All students participated in both the traditional SCPE as well as two days of clinical experiences in the simulation laboratory. Both experiences were followed by the completion of surveys with the same ten questions reflecting on the effectiveness of the clinical experience as well as the effectiveness of the instructor/preceptor. Utilizing IBM SPSS Statistics 24, the data collected was analyzed by question, category, and overall experience. Results:Surveys were collected from the students after participation in both the simulation and SCPEs. There were a total of 44 respondents with a demographic distribution of a majority of females (65.2%), 20 to 24 years of age (91.3%). Both surveys contained 10 questions reflecting upon the learning experience (5 questions) and instructor/preceptor effectiveness (5 questions). All responses were based on a Likert scale ranging from 1 to 5 (1 = strongly disagree, 5 = strongly agree). Overall, there was a significant difference in responses when comparing the evaluation of the simulation learning (mean=4.9/5) to the traditional supervised clinical practice experience (mean=4.6/5) with a p-value of 0.03. In particular, significant differences in responses were noted with respect to go...
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