Nonadherent with Medications?
AAPA ePoster library. Jackson D. 05/17/17; 180505; 118
David Jackson
David Jackson
Login now to access Regular content available to all registered users.
Abstract
Rate & Comment (0)
Abstract Objective. In patients with chronic disease, nonadherence to medication regimens contributes to both morbidity and mortality and the increasing economic burden of healthcare. Many chronic diseases can adequately be managed with pharmacological interventions. The primary factors that contribute to medication nonadherence are: (a) patient, (b) provider, and (c) cost related. Understanding barriers to their compliance will enable providers to address patient needs improving medication adherence and overall health status. Methods and participants. In September 2016, SurveyMonkey was utilized to administer an online survey. It was sent to 880 individuals in the United States who were at least 35 years old, and had at least one chronic medical condition that required pharmacotherapy for at least six-months, to determine why patients with chronic disease are nonadherent with their medications. The chronic diseases included in this study were: (a) hypertension, (b) hyperlipidemia, (c) diabetes, (d) depression, (e) heart disease, (f) thyroid disease, (g) anxiety, (h) arthritis, (i) gastrointestinal disorders, (j) asthma, and (k) HIV. The data was analyzed with Microsoft's SPSS Version 24. ANOVAs and t-tests for statistical significance were performed to identify factors that impact medication nonadherence. Results. Surveys were distributed to 880 individuals, 749 (85.1%) responded. After inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied, 716 (81.3%) completed the survey. The analysis demonstrated no statistical significance from the effect of: (a) age, (b) gender, (c) household income, (d) level of education, and (e) geographic region with regards to medication adherence. Neither a heavy pill burden nor the frequency of pills taken per day had an effect on medication compliance. Regimens with specific requirements such as drugs needing to be taken at certain times of the day, or with or without food, also had no effect on compliance. A T-test was performed looking at participants who experienced unpleasant side effects from their medication and the mean medication compliance rates. Those who experienced unpleasant side effects had a mean medication compliance score of 8.83 on a 10-point scale. This compared to those who did not experience unpleasant side effects who had a mean medication compliance score of 9.38 on a 10-point scale (p < 0.0001). There were 135 (19.3%) participants who reported they experience unpleasant side effects from their prescrib...
Abstract Objective. In patients with chronic disease, nonadherence to medication regimens contributes to both morbidity and mortality and the increasing economic burden of healthcare. Many chronic diseases can adequately be managed with pharmacological interventions. The primary factors that contribute to medication nonadherence are: (a) patient, (b) provider, and (c) cost related. Understanding barriers to their compliance will enable providers to address patient needs improving medication adherence and overall health status. Methods and participants. In September 2016, SurveyMonkey was utilized to administer an online survey. It was sent to 880 individuals in the United States who were at least 35 years old, and had at least one chronic medical condition that required pharmacotherapy for at least six-months, to determine why patients with chronic disease are nonadherent with their medications. The chronic diseases included in this study were: (a) hypertension, (b) hyperlipidemia, (c) diabetes, (d) depression, (e) heart disease, (f) thyroid disease, (g) anxiety, (h) arthritis, (i) gastrointestinal disorders, (j) asthma, and (k) HIV. The data was analyzed with Microsoft's SPSS Version 24. ANOVAs and t-tests for statistical significance were performed to identify factors that impact medication nonadherence. Results. Surveys were distributed to 880 individuals, 749 (85.1%) responded. After inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied, 716 (81.3%) completed the survey. The analysis demonstrated no statistical significance from the effect of: (a) age, (b) gender, (c) household income, (d) level of education, and (e) geographic region with regards to medication adherence. Neither a heavy pill burden nor the frequency of pills taken per day had an effect on medication compliance. Regimens with specific requirements such as drugs needing to be taken at certain times of the day, or with or without food, also had no effect on compliance. A T-test was performed looking at participants who experienced unpleasant side effects from their medication and the mean medication compliance rates. Those who experienced unpleasant side effects had a mean medication compliance score of 8.83 on a 10-point scale. This compared to those who did not experience unpleasant side effects who had a mean medication compliance score of 9.38 on a 10-point scale (p < 0.0001). There were 135 (19.3%) participants who reported they experience unpleasant side effects from their prescrib...
    This eLearning portal is powered by:
    This eLearning portal is powered by MULTIEPORTAL
Anonymous User Privacy Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies (Always Active)

MULTILEARNING platforms and tools hereinafter referred as “MLG SOFTWARE” are provided to you as pure educational platforms/services requiring cookies to operate. In the case of the MLG SOFTWARE, cookies are essential for the Platform to function properly for the provision of education. If these cookies are disabled, a large subset of the functionality provided by the Platform will either be unavailable or cease to work as expected. The MLG SOFTWARE do not capture non-essential activities such as menu items and listings you click on or pages viewed.


Performance Cookies

Performance cookies are used to analyse how visitors use a website in order to provide a better user experience.


Save Settings