Denying the Grim Reaper
AAPA ePoster library. Jackson D. 05/17/17; 180500; 108
David Jackson
David Jackson
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Abstract
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Abstract Background. Millions of Americans aged 65 and older contract vaccine-preventable diseases, including: (a) influenza, (b) pneumococcal disease, and (c) herpes zoster. This often results in a significant decrease in quality of life, while increasing hospitalizations, morbidity and mortality. The US spends billions of dollars annually to care for individuals with the aforementioned diseases and their sequela. Despite reducing the incidence and severity of disease in a cost effective manner, vaccination rates remain well below those established in Healthy People 2020. This research identified factors most influential to individuals aged 65 and older in their decision to receive recommended vaccines. Methods and Participants. Printed surveys were given to participants in publicly accessible areas throughout NYC and Long Island between February and November 2016. Participants included those who: (a) were ≥ 65 years old, (b) received at least one of the influenza, pneumococcal, or shingles vaccinations, (c) were able to speak, read, and write in English, and (d) were oriented to person, place, and time. Exclusion criteria comprised those who: (a) did not meet inclusion criteria, (b) were not able to make their own medical decisions, or (c) were required to be vaccinated by place of residence or employment. Data collected was analyzed with Microsoft's SPSS Version 24 to identify which factors were most influential and if different factors were more important to different groups. T-tests for independent samples were performed to compare demographic characteristics and influencing factors on vaccination decision-making. Results. A total of 301 paper surveys were completed; 70 were eliminated based on exclusion criteria, leaving 231 surveys for subsequent analysis. A majority of those surveyed recalled receiving the flu (91.3%) or pneumonia (79.2%) vaccine, compared to the shingles (43.3%) vaccine. Across all demographics, healthcare provider recommendation to be vaccinated showed the strongest impact (77.5%), followed by having a prior case of the disease (55%), and knowing someone else who had that disease (48.1%) [% reflects participant score of important or very important]. People aged ≥74 were more likely to be positively influenced than their younger counterparts to receive vaccines by: (a) family members [p=0.002], (b) friends [p=0.004], and (c) media reminders [p=0.021]. There were no statistically significant differences in the motiv...
Abstract Background. Millions of Americans aged 65 and older contract vaccine-preventable diseases, including: (a) influenza, (b) pneumococcal disease, and (c) herpes zoster. This often results in a significant decrease in quality of life, while increasing hospitalizations, morbidity and mortality. The US spends billions of dollars annually to care for individuals with the aforementioned diseases and their sequela. Despite reducing the incidence and severity of disease in a cost effective manner, vaccination rates remain well below those established in Healthy People 2020. This research identified factors most influential to individuals aged 65 and older in their decision to receive recommended vaccines. Methods and Participants. Printed surveys were given to participants in publicly accessible areas throughout NYC and Long Island between February and November 2016. Participants included those who: (a) were ≥ 65 years old, (b) received at least one of the influenza, pneumococcal, or shingles vaccinations, (c) were able to speak, read, and write in English, and (d) were oriented to person, place, and time. Exclusion criteria comprised those who: (a) did not meet inclusion criteria, (b) were not able to make their own medical decisions, or (c) were required to be vaccinated by place of residence or employment. Data collected was analyzed with Microsoft's SPSS Version 24 to identify which factors were most influential and if different factors were more important to different groups. T-tests for independent samples were performed to compare demographic characteristics and influencing factors on vaccination decision-making. Results. A total of 301 paper surveys were completed; 70 were eliminated based on exclusion criteria, leaving 231 surveys for subsequent analysis. A majority of those surveyed recalled receiving the flu (91.3%) or pneumonia (79.2%) vaccine, compared to the shingles (43.3%) vaccine. Across all demographics, healthcare provider recommendation to be vaccinated showed the strongest impact (77.5%), followed by having a prior case of the disease (55%), and knowing someone else who had that disease (48.1%) [% reflects participant score of important or very important]. People aged ≥74 were more likely to be positively influenced than their younger counterparts to receive vaccines by: (a) family members [p=0.002], (b) friends [p=0.004], and (c) media reminders [p=0.021]. There were no statistically significant differences in the motiv...
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