Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Usage in a College Population: Athletes vs. non-athletes
AAPA ePoster library. Andreeff R. 05/17/17; 180488; 62
Renee Andreeff
Renee Andreeff
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Abstract
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Purpose: Due to the popularity of NSAID usage throughout the United States, it is paramount for everyone to understand when and how NSAIDs should be administered. Having the proper knowledge, background, and awareness of NSAID indications and side effects could prevent damage to vital organs and improve healing. The purpose of this survey study was to investigate if a significant difference exists between athletes and non-athletes NSAID use and knowledge in an urban college population. Methods: Full IRB approval was granted. An anonymous face validated 18-question survey was administered to a convenience sample through the colleges' e-mail distribution system with a link to SurveyMonkey®. The eighteen-question survey included demographics such as the participant's sex, major of study, level of athletic involvement, and sport(s) played. Questions gathered information pertaining to the participants NSAID usage including specific drug used, why they take it, and frequency of use. Additional questions assessed the participants' knowledge of NSAID side effects. A total of 180 surveys were collected and analyzed using SPSS. Results: The majority of respondents were female (n = 144), 77% (n = 138) were healthcare majors, and 29% (n = 52) participated in college level sports. The results revealed that 98% of participants have used NSAIDS and 43% (n = 77) revealed that they follow NSAID dosages and frequencies. Results revealed a higher mean accuracy score on knowledge of NSAIDs side effect questions for healthcare majors (73%) vs. non-healthcare majors (64.2%) and a statistically significant (p < .001) difference was found between athletes and non-athletes knowledge of NSAID side effects. Results revealed that there was not a statistically significant difference (p = .14) between chronic NSAID use in athletes and non-athletes, defined as daily use for more than 10 days or every other day for a month. Conclusion: By evaluating the student population, students can be made aware of the importance of knowing about NSAID and OTC medication use. The results revealed that almost all participants have used NSAIDS. Results also revealed that there is a better understanding of NSAID side effects among healthcare majors and among non-athletes. In addition, results revealed that chronic use is not a concern at this institution. These are promising results that suggest that a college population is generally responsible when it comes to use of NSAID medica...
Purpose: Due to the popularity of NSAID usage throughout the United States, it is paramount for everyone to understand when and how NSAIDs should be administered. Having the proper knowledge, background, and awareness of NSAID indications and side effects could prevent damage to vital organs and improve healing. The purpose of this survey study was to investigate if a significant difference exists between athletes and non-athletes NSAID use and knowledge in an urban college population. Methods: Full IRB approval was granted. An anonymous face validated 18-question survey was administered to a convenience sample through the colleges' e-mail distribution system with a link to SurveyMonkey®. The eighteen-question survey included demographics such as the participant's sex, major of study, level of athletic involvement, and sport(s) played. Questions gathered information pertaining to the participants NSAID usage including specific drug used, why they take it, and frequency of use. Additional questions assessed the participants' knowledge of NSAID side effects. A total of 180 surveys were collected and analyzed using SPSS. Results: The majority of respondents were female (n = 144), 77% (n = 138) were healthcare majors, and 29% (n = 52) participated in college level sports. The results revealed that 98% of participants have used NSAIDS and 43% (n = 77) revealed that they follow NSAID dosages and frequencies. Results revealed a higher mean accuracy score on knowledge of NSAIDs side effect questions for healthcare majors (73%) vs. non-healthcare majors (64.2%) and a statistically significant (p < .001) difference was found between athletes and non-athletes knowledge of NSAID side effects. Results revealed that there was not a statistically significant difference (p = .14) between chronic NSAID use in athletes and non-athletes, defined as daily use for more than 10 days or every other day for a month. Conclusion: By evaluating the student population, students can be made aware of the importance of knowing about NSAID and OTC medication use. The results revealed that almost all participants have used NSAIDS. Results also revealed that there is a better understanding of NSAID side effects among healthcare majors and among non-athletes. In addition, results revealed that chronic use is not a concern at this institution. These are promising results that suggest that a college population is generally responsible when it comes to use of NSAID medica...
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