The Inclusion of Mass Casualty Training During Physician Assistant Education
AAPA ePoster library. Elzay S. 05/17/17; 180477; 19
Samuel Elzay
Samuel Elzay
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Abstract
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The purpose of this study was to evaluate the benefit of including mass casualty training sessions as well as a mock mass casualty incident (MCI) into didactic year PA education. Public shootings, bombings, terrorist attacks, and natural disasters such as hurricanes are more frequently exhausting medical resources beyond their limit. A physician assistant (PA) can play a vital role in maximizing victim survival and help alleviate an overburdened system.1,2 State provisions are evolving to improve the utilization of Advanced Practice Providers such as PA's in disaster relief efforts to increase providers available to respond to MCI's.3 Incorporating MCI training in an academic setting has shown to improve knowledge and understanding of mid-level providers such as PAs.4 Indeed this novel approach is also nascent in medical programs as well.5 The aim of this study evaluated skills and understanding of triage concepts related to MCI's before and after PA students participated in structured training. Didactic year PA students (n=34) from a single university were asked to participate in this cross-sectional descriptive study. Special training sessions were presented in coordination with the required emergency medicine curriculum. Participation in these sessions culminated with an interagency simulated MCI response exercise. Students completed identical pre/post questionnaires. Baseline knowledge was assessed prior to initiation of the educational exercises with the final assessment completed within a week of student participation in the simulated MCI. Knowledge-based questions were used to evaluate understanding of patient care and resource use. Self-report questions assessed application of and confidence with applicable clinical skills such as; hemorrhage control, spinal and extremity immobilization, airway, venous access, treating multiple patients, and understanding of the widely used Simple Triage and Rapid Treatment (START®) method. Questions were answered using a Likert scale. Results suggest that this training structure greatly increased PA students understanding of how to respond and treat patients during a mass casualty event. Indeed 19 of the 21 paired sample t-tests showed significance following analysis (p< 0.05). The only non-significant variables were 'head to toe assessment' and 'extremity splinting' (p>0.05). Including MCI training into didactic year PA education appears to be valuable in preparing students to effectively treat and care for vic...
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the benefit of including mass casualty training sessions as well as a mock mass casualty incident (MCI) into didactic year PA education. Public shootings, bombings, terrorist attacks, and natural disasters such as hurricanes are more frequently exhausting medical resources beyond their limit. A physician assistant (PA) can play a vital role in maximizing victim survival and help alleviate an overburdened system.1,2 State provisions are evolving to improve the utilization of Advanced Practice Providers such as PA's in disaster relief efforts to increase providers available to respond to MCI's.3 Incorporating MCI training in an academic setting has shown to improve knowledge and understanding of mid-level providers such as PAs.4 Indeed this novel approach is also nascent in medical programs as well.5 The aim of this study evaluated skills and understanding of triage concepts related to MCI's before and after PA students participated in structured training. Didactic year PA students (n=34) from a single university were asked to participate in this cross-sectional descriptive study. Special training sessions were presented in coordination with the required emergency medicine curriculum. Participation in these sessions culminated with an interagency simulated MCI response exercise. Students completed identical pre/post questionnaires. Baseline knowledge was assessed prior to initiation of the educational exercises with the final assessment completed within a week of student participation in the simulated MCI. Knowledge-based questions were used to evaluate understanding of patient care and resource use. Self-report questions assessed application of and confidence with applicable clinical skills such as; hemorrhage control, spinal and extremity immobilization, airway, venous access, treating multiple patients, and understanding of the widely used Simple Triage and Rapid Treatment (START®) method. Questions were answered using a Likert scale. Results suggest that this training structure greatly increased PA students understanding of how to respond and treat patients during a mass casualty event. Indeed 19 of the 21 paired sample t-tests showed significance following analysis (p< 0.05). The only non-significant variables were 'head to toe assessment' and 'extremity splinting' (p>0.05). Including MCI training into didactic year PA education appears to be valuable in preparing students to effectively treat and care for vic...
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